Recycle IT 4 U - weee compliant

WEEE Compliancy

 

With the adoption of the WEEE directives by the EU, the disposal of redundant IT and computer equipment has become an issue for all businesses in the UK. Businesses with old or redundant personal computers or other electronic equipment that is deemed to have components classed as hazardous by the WEEE rules, needs to find a recycling centre which operates WEEE Compliance Schemes.

WEEE Compliant Electronic Recycling

  • We are fully licensed to collect IT and Telecommunications equipment covered by Category 3 
of the WEEE directive: PCs, servers, monitors, network equipment, printers, photocopiers, 
faxes, mobile phones, AV equipment, ancillary items and cables.
  • We offer a fast, efficient, friendly, secure service using our own vehicles and uniformed staff.
  • All items collected have their serial numbers and asset tags listed on a Certificate of
 Disposal that is issued within seven working days.

Details of the “Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment” (WEEE) Directive

The Commission of the European Communities proposed a Directive (in June 2000) on Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) that is designed to protect soil, water and air from pollution caused by management of WEEE, to avoid the generation of waste and to reduce the harmfulness of WEEE. Further objectives are to preserve resources, especially energy and to create harmonisation of national measures across member states.

The main devices which are identified, as potentially dangerous, in electrical and electronic equipment include printed circuit boards, cables, wires, plastics containing flame retardants, mercury switches, displays (e.g. cathode ray tubes), batteries, data storage media, light generators (e.g. lamps), capacitors, resistors, relays, sensors and connectors (mobile phones contain many of the above components). The substances within these devices which cause most concern environmentally are the heavy metals such as lead, mercury, cadmium and chromium, halogenated substances (e.g. CFCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (aka PCBs, not to be confused with printed circuit boards), PVC and brominated flame retardants (which can give rise to extremely toxic dioxins such as PBDDs and furans such as PBDFs when incinerated). Other components which are mentioned are arsenic, asbestos, nickel and even copper (which can act as a catalyst to increase the formation of dioxins during incineration).